Engineering & Mining Journal

FEB 2018

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2 E&MJ • FEBRUARY 2018 FROM THE EDITOR The Fourth Industrial Revolution is knocking on the min- ing industry's door. Today's engineers are laying the foun- dation for delivering tomorrow's natural resources. It's an incredible responsibility that affects many people and it must be managed professionally and ethically. The com- panies that are prepared will prosper fi nancially and they will be rewarded with respect and social acceptance. World leaders gathered in Davos, Switzerland, during January for the World Economic Forum. Aside from the political propaganda, several sessions discussed global- ization, the increasing use of technology and the connected world. While it's obvious few of these economists have ever set foot in a mine, their concerns could easily be applied to our industry. One of the refrains, globalization and technology advances have failed the working class, can explain much of the political tumult today. Those who despise this globally connected economy see multinational companies as villains sourcing the lowest-cost resources, taking advantage of labor, and plundering with little regard for the environment. The engineers embracing technology as exceptionally effi cient see it differ- ently. They see autonomous production systems that operate more safely with lower costs. The companies that benefi t from these advances in technology need to continuously retool and retrain their workforce to maintain their edge. Un- derground operators witnessed this transformation when mines began running LHDs remotely 20 years ago, and now open-pit mines are operating entire fl eets of haul trucks without drivers. Rather than losing that talent pool as this transi- tion evolves, the workforce should be retrained and redeployed. Miners can learn and adapt quickly. Too many companies fail to explain their long-term goals. The mines and mills that are commissioned today may operate for generations. They are most likely situated in a remote location with a limited amount of human resources. It's incumbent upon mining companies to create employment opportunities and train their workforce to be the miners of the future. This should be a transparent process and they should promote it. Otherwise, a company risks being branded socially as uncompassionate. A company's brand and its message are incredibly important. Innovation will attract investment, which will allow further implementation of technology. This in turn will attract young, clever minds as well as experienced leaders, sustaining the company's ability to prepare for the next wave, such as artifi cial intelligence and augmented reality, or whatever the future may hold. All of this works together. For workers to believe that technology will play a positive role in their future, they need to be included in discussions surrounding the Internet of Things, Big Data and autonomy. It takes time and effort to build a brand. When problems occur, the mining company will not only be judged by how it reacted, but how well its supporters defend it. People can overthrow governments and they can certainly make or break a mining company. Building for the Future The Fourth Industrial Revolution is knocking on the min- ing industry's door. Today's engineers are laying the foun- dation for delivering tomorrow's natural resources. It's an incredible responsibility that affects many people and it must be managed professionally and ethically. The com- panies that are prepared will prosper fi nancially and they will be rewarded with respect and social acceptance. World leaders gathered in Davos, Switzerland, during Steve Fiscor Publisher & Editor-in-Chief Steve Fiscor, Publisher & Editor-in-Chief sfi scor@mining-media.com Mining Media International, Inc. 11655 Central Parkway, Suite 306; Jacksonville, Florida 32224 USA Phone: +1.904.721.2925 / Fax: +1.904.721.2930 Editorial Publisher & Editor-In-Chief—Steve Fiscor, sfi scor@mining-media.com Associate Editor—Jennifer Jensen, jjensen@mining-media.com Technical Writer—Jesse Morton, jmorton@mining-media.com Contributing Editor—Russ Carter, rcarter@mining-media.com European Editor—Simon Walker, simon.emj@btinternet.com Latin American Editor—Oscar Martinez, omartinez@mining-media.com South African Editor—Gavin du Venage, gavinduvenage@gmail.com Graphic Designer—Tad Seabrook, tseabrook@mining-media.com Sales Midwest/Eastern U.S. & Canada, Sales—Victor Matteucci, vmatteucci@mining-media.com Western U.S., Canada & Australia, Sales—Frank Strazzulla, fstrazzulla@mining-media.com Scandinavia, UK & European Sales—Colm Barry, colm.barry@telia.com Germany, Austria & Switzerland Sales—Gerd Strasmann, info@strasmann-media.de Japan Sales—Masao Ishiguro, ma.ishiguro@w9.dion.ne.jp Production Manager—Dan Fitts, dfi tts@mining-media.com www.e-mj.com Engineering & Mining Journal, Volume 219, Issue 2, (ISSN 0095-8948) is published monthly by Mining Media International, Inc., 11655 Central Parkway, Suite 306, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (mining-media.com). Periodicals Postage paid at Jacksonville, FL, and additional mailing offi ces. Canada Post Publi- cations Mail Agreement No. 41450540. Canada return address: PO Box 2600, Mississauga ON L4T 0A8, Email: circulation@mining-media.com. Current and back issues and additional resources, including subscription request forms and an editorial calendar, are available at www.e-mj.com. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Free and controlled circulation to qualifi ed subscrib- ers. Visit www.e-mj.com to subscribe. Non-qualifi ed persons may subscribe at the following rates: USA & Canada, 1 year, $90. Outside the USA & Can- ada, 1 year, $150. For subscriber services or to order single copies, contact E&MJ, c/o Stamats Data Management, 615 Fifth Street SE, Cedar Rapids IA 52401, 1-800-553-8878 ext. 5028 or email subscriptions@e-mj.com. ARCHIVES AND MICROFORM: This magazine is available for research and retrieval of selected archived articles from leading electronic databases and online search services, including Factiva, LexisNexis, and Proquest. For mi- croform availability, contact ProQuest at 800-521-0600 or +1.734.761.4700, or search the Serials in Microform listings at www.proquest.com. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to E&MJ, 11655 Central Parkway, Suite 306, Jacksonville, FL 32224-2659. REPRINTS: Mining Media International, Inc., 11655 Central Parkway, Suite 306, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA; email: subscriptions@e-mj.com; phone: +1.904.721.2925, fax: +1.904.721.2930; www.mining-media.com. PHOTOCOPIES: Authorization to photocopy articles for internal corporate, personal, or instructional use may be obtained from the Copyright Clear- ance Center (CCC) at +1.978.750.8400. Obtain further information at copyright.com. EXECUTIVE OFFICE: Mining Media International, Inc., 11655 Central Park- way, Suite 306, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA phone: +1.904.721.2925, fax: +1.904.721.2930, www.mining-media.com. COPYRIGHT 2018: Engineering & Mining Journal, incorporating World Mining Equipment, World Min- ing and Mining Equipment International. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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