Engineering & Mining Journal

OCT 2018

Engineering and Mining Journal - Whether the market is copper, gold, nickel, iron ore, lead/zinc, PGM, diamonds or other commodities, E&MJ takes the lead in projecting trends, following development and reporting on the most efficient operating pr

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2 E&MJ • OCTOBER 2018 FROM THE EDITOR This edition of E&MJ has 10 pages dedicated to Nordic mining and technology. Much of it is based on what I learned during my trip to Skellefteå, Sweden, to participate in the Euro Mine Expo event during June. One of the inter- esting things about this event is the collection of languages (Swedish, Suomi and Russian), dialects and the cultures. To say they have a different perspective there would be put- ting it mildly. At the end of the day, however, it's hardrock miners and suppliers, and they have a lot in common with their counterparts around the world. Late one night in the pub, as an example, an underground driller was taking me to task. "We have the deepest, safest and most advanced mines in the world," he said with a lot of pride. That's a good thing. What mining executive wouldn't want to hear one of their own bragging about their mine this way. But I couldn't let him get away with it. I told him there were a lot of safe mines and that, yes, his mine was deep, but it wasn't the deepest. At the same time, E&MJ's ad salesman was reminding me how big this guy was and looking for the door. I stayed the course and explained that there were similar mines doing similar things in eastern Canada, the U.S., and Australia, and that some of the deepest mines were in South Africa. After another round, we agreed to disagree. The next day I felt confi rmation when a global marketing manager from Epiroc repeated most of the statistics I rattled off in the pub. In this part of the world, climate change from greenhouse gases is accepted, not debated, and everyone is doing their part to reduce their carbon footprint. They have an advantage. Most of their power is derived from renewable sources (hydro- electricity). So, switching from fossil-fueled engines to battery-powered drives really does reduce the carbon footprint, where in many parts of the world it does not. They also realize that, if they are going down this road, then they better start making some batteries otherwise they will be sending their money to Asian battery factories rather than oil sheiks in the Middle East. So Northvolt's decision to locate a major, modern battery factory in Skellefteå was a timely topic of conversation. Speaking at Euro Mine Expo, Mikael Damberg, Sweden's Minister for Enterprise and Innovation, cited the new Northvolt battery plant as a prime example of a new, sustainable transformation in the economy that will depend on minerals and met- als. He also said he has never seen such a big interest in the mining sector. "The debate today is more about how mining is a part of modern society's solutions, not part of its problems," Damberg said. Sweden has high ambitions in terms of CO 2 emissions, which go well beyond the rest of the European Union, Damberg explained. Among other things, emissions from public transport is set to decrease by 70% by 2030 and this will not be possible without electrifi cation. "We have said that we want to be one of the fi rst fossil-free welfare states in the world," Damberg said. "In order to secure the availability of raw materials, the Nordic region needs to increase production to support this economy." What you will read in the Nordic report is that region's mining sector is trying to set the example as the world's most sustainable. The technology to meet these sustainability requirements is developing at a rapid pace. With many mining suppli- ers as well as technology developers based in the region, the mines there are also serving as the proving grounds to meet the carbon-free challenge. Meeting the Carbon-free Challenge Steve Fiscor Publisher & Editor-in-Chief Steve Fiscor, Publisher & Editor-in-Chief sfi scor@mining-media.com Mining Media International, Inc. 11655 Central Parkway, Suite 306; Jacksonville, Florida 32224 USA Phone: +1.904.721.2925 / Fax: +1.904.721.2930 Editorial Publisher & Editor-In-Chief—Steve Fiscor, sfi scor@mining-media.com Associate Editor—Jennifer Jensen, jjensen@mining-media.com Technical Writer—Jesse Morton, jmorton@mining-media.com Contributing Editor—Russ Carter, rcarter@mining-media.com Latin American Editor—Oscar Martinez, omartinez@mining-media.com South African Editor—Gavin du Venage, gavinduvenage@gmail.com Graphic Designer—Tad Seabrook, tseabrook@mining-media.com Sales Midwest/Eastern U.S. & Canada, Sales—Victor Matteucci, vmatteucci@mining-media.com Western U.S., Canada & Australia, Sales—Frank Strazzulla, fstrazzulla@mining-media.com Scandinavia, UK & European Sales—Colm Barry, colm.barry@telia.com Germany, Austria & Switzerland Sales—Gerd Strasmann, info@strasmann-media.de Japan Sales—Masao Ishiguro, ma.ishiguro@w9.dion.ne.jp Production Manager—Dan Fitts, dfi tts@mining-media.com www.e-mj.com Engineering & Mining Journal, Volume 219, Issue 10, (ISSN 0095-8948) is published monthly by Mining Media International, Inc., 11655 Central Parkway, Suite 306, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (mining-media.com). Periodicals Postage paid at Jacksonville, FL, and additional mailing offi ces. Canada Post Publi- cations Mail Agreement No. 41450540. Canada return address: PO Box 2600, Mississauga ON L4T 0A8, Email: circulation@mining-media.com. Current and back issues and additional resources, including subscription request forms and an editorial calendar, are available at www.e-mj.com. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Free and controlled circulation to qualifi ed subscrib- ers. Visit www.e-mj.com to subscribe. Non-qualifi ed persons may subscribe at the following rates: USA & Canada, 1 year, $90. Outside the USA & Can- ada, 1 year, $150. For subscriber services or to order single copies, contact E&MJ, c/o Stamats Data Management, 615 Fifth Street SE, Cedar Rapids IA 52401, 1-800-553-8878 ext. 5028 or email subscriptions@e-mj.com. ARCHIVES AND MICROFORM: This magazine is available for research and retrieval of selected archived articles from leading electronic databases and online search services, including Factiva, LexisNexis, and Proquest. For mi- croform availability, contact ProQuest at 800-521-0600 or +1.734.761.4700, or search the Serials in Microform listings at www.proquest.com. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to E&MJ, 11655 Central Parkway, Suite 306, Jacksonville, FL 32224-2659. REPRINTS: Mining Media International, Inc., 11655 Central Parkway, Suite 306, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA; email: subscriptions@e-mj.com; phone: +1.904.721.2925, fax: +1.904.721.2930; www.mining-media.com. PHOTOCOPIES: Authorization to photocopy articles for internal corporate, personal, or instructional use may be obtained from the Copyright Clear- ance Center (CCC) at +1.978.750.8400. Obtain further information at copyright.com. EXECUTIVE OFFICE: Mining Media International, Inc., 11655 Central Park- way, Suite 306, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA phone: +1.904.721.2925, fax: +1.904.721.2930, www.mining-media.com. COPYRIGHT 2018: Engineering & Mining Journal, incorporating World Mining Equipment, World Min- ing and Mining Equipment International. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. This edition of mining and technology. Much of it is based on what I learned during my trip to Skellefteå, Sweden, to participate in the Euro Mine Expo event during June. One of the inter- esting things about this event is the collection of languages (Swedish, Suomi and Russian), dialects and the cultures.

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