Engineering & Mining Journal

APR 2018

Engineering and Mining Journal - Whether the market is copper, gold, nickel, iron ore, lead/zinc, PGM, diamonds or other commodities, E&MJ takes the lead in projecting trends, following development and reporting on the most efficient operating pr

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2 E&MJ • APRIL 2018 FROM THE EDITOR Those who were unable to attend the keynote session at the 2018 Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME) annual conference missed a rare treat: the chance to hear a great politician talk about the benefi ts of mining. The event took place in Minneapolis this year and U.S. Rep. Rick Nolan (D-MN), who represents Minnesota's eighth district, kicked off the panel discussion. That district includes Hib- bing and the Iron Range, Duluth and the Boundary Waters. The moderator introduced Rep. Nolan as an Iron Range native. Taking the stage, he explained that his district is proud to call itself mining country. He cited examples of why mining is so vital to U.S. national and economic security. He referred to a recent Homeland Security study, which concluded that 13% of the U.S. GDP originates from Lake Superior and enters the market through the locks at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. "If these locks failed, it would create a national depression," Nolan said. "The iron ore that passes through those locks is the lifeblood for many industries. That's why they have military protection and bipartisan support to repair them." The Boundary Waters have become a focal point for environmental activists contesting new mine permits in Minnesota. Nolan helped craft the original legisla- tion that protected the Boundary Waters. "Northern Minnesota with all of its lakes, rivers and forests has coexisted with mining for 130 years and we have the cleanest water anywhere in this country," Nolan said. "We know how to do things right. We're committed to doing things right, just like everyone in this auditorium today." But, it wasn't always that way. Nolan said that when he was a kid, the rivers were running sewers and lakes were catching fi re. "Acid rain was destroying our forests," Nolan said. "We were dumping taconite tailings into Lake Superior. Hell, we had to bring drinking water into Duluth, which sits on the shores of the greatest fresh water lake anywhere in the world." People had enough and that's when the environmental movement began. There were false narratives back then, too. Businesses said they could not comply with all these rules and regulations and continue to be profi table. "Working together with industry, we placed our faith in technology and science, and we found a way to make it work," Nolan said. Today, there is a new false narrative. One that says society must choose be- tween industry and the environment. "We have the science and the brains and the technology to have both mining and a healthy environment," Nolan said. "What we do in the mining business is noble and a vital part of the grand march toward the improvement of humanity." "Our friends that are concerned with the environment need to know about the real choices," Nolan said. "Environmental exploitation is wrong and unacceptable. If they want to enjoy the benefi ts that come from iron ore, industrial metals and rare earth minerals, then they need to question the ethics of getting it from a third-world country with questionable environmental, labor, and health and safety standards." He reminded the audience they need to be actively involved in politics. "The poli- ticians that represent you need to know where you stand and you need to know where they stand. If you don't make that connection, they don't know you exist or they know you exist and that you don't care." Well said, congressman. Thank you. Mining is Noble and Vital Those who were unable to attend the keynote session at the 2018 Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME) annual conference missed a rare treat: the chance to hear a great politician talk about the benefi ts of mining. The event took place in Minneapolis this year and U.S. Rep. Rick Nolan (D-MN), who represents Minnesota's eighth district, kicked off the panel discussion. That district includes Hib- bing and the Iron Range, Duluth and the Boundary Waters. Steve Fiscor Publisher & Editor-in-Chief Steve Fiscor, Publisher & Editor-in-Chief sfi scor@mining-media.com Mining Media International, Inc. 11655 Central Parkway, Suite 306; Jacksonville, Florida 32224 USA Phone: +1.904.721.2925 / Fax: +1.904.721.2930 Editorial Publisher & Editor-In-Chief—Steve Fiscor, sfi scor@mining-media.com Associate Editor—Jennifer Jensen, jjensen@mining-media.com Technical Writer—Jesse Morton, jmorton@mining-media.com Contributing Editor—Russ Carter, rcarter@mining-media.com Latin American Editor—Oscar Martinez, omartinez@mining-media.com South African Editor—Gavin du Venage, gavinduvenage@gmail.com Graphic Designer—Tad Seabrook, tseabrook@mining-media.com Sales Midwest/Eastern U.S. & Canada, Sales—Victor Matteucci, vmatteucci@mining-media.com Western U.S., Canada & Australia, Sales—Frank Strazzulla, fstrazzulla@mining-media.com Scandinavia, UK & European Sales—Colm Barry, colm.barry@telia.com Germany, Austria & Switzerland Sales—Gerd Strasmann, info@strasmann-media.de Japan Sales—Masao Ishiguro, ma.ishiguro@w9.dion.ne.jp Production Manager—Dan Fitts, dfi tts@mining-media.com www.e-mj.com Engineering & Mining Journal, Volume 219, Issue 2, (ISSN 0095-8948) is published monthly by Mining Media International, Inc., 11655 Central Parkway, Suite 306, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (mining-media.com). Periodicals Postage paid at Jacksonville, FL, and additional mailing offi ces. Canada Post Publi- cations Mail Agreement No. 41450540. Canada return address: PO Box 2600, Mississauga ON L4T 0A8, Email: circulation@mining-media.com. Current and back issues and additional resources, including subscription request forms and an editorial calendar, are available at www.e-mj.com. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Free and controlled circulation to qualifi ed subscrib- ers. Visit www.e-mj.com to subscribe. Non-qualifi ed persons may subscribe at the following rates: USA & Canada, 1 year, $90. Outside the USA & Can- ada, 1 year, $150. For subscriber services or to order single copies, contact E&MJ, c/o Stamats Data Management, 615 Fifth Street SE, Cedar Rapids IA 52401, 1-800-553-8878 ext. 5028 or email subscriptions@e-mj.com. ARCHIVES AND MICROFORM: This magazine is available for research and retrieval of selected archived articles from leading electronic databases and online search services, including Factiva, LexisNexis, and Proquest. For mi- croform availability, contact ProQuest at 800-521-0600 or +1.734.761.4700, or search the Serials in Microform listings at www.proquest.com. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to E&MJ, 11655 Central Parkway, Suite 306, Jacksonville, FL 32224-2659. REPRINTS: Mining Media International, Inc., 11655 Central Parkway, Suite 306, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA; email: subscriptions@e-mj.com; phone: +1.904.721.2925, fax: +1.904.721.2930; www.mining-media.com. PHOTOCOPIES: Authorization to photocopy articles for internal corporate, personal, or instructional use may be obtained from the Copyright Clear- ance Center (CCC) at +1.978.750.8400. Obtain further information at copyright.com. EXECUTIVE OFFICE: Mining Media International, Inc., 11655 Central Park- way, Suite 306, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA phone: +1.904.721.2925, fax: +1.904.721.2930, www.mining-media.com. COPYRIGHT 2018: Engineering & Mining Journal, incorporating World Mining Equipment, World Min- ing and Mining Equipment International. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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